KRSA PROGRAMMING EQUIPMENT and RADIO TOWER INFORMATION PAGE


WHAT IS THIS?

It is a Beacon Light that sets on top of the KRSA communnication towers. It blinks 24 hours to make air craft aware of the tower danger.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is the top of the towers where the beacons set. Two of the beacon lights stopped working and had been off for a few months. We notified the Aviation control folks to let them know to reroute the flight path away from this area until we could get the beacons repaired. This happened a fews years ago on one of the other towers also. It cost the station over $8,000 to repair it! This is no small job!

 

 

The KRSA Radio towers are located in Petersburg, Alaska. The studios in town send the radio programs (signal) to a transmitter / relay station at Kings Row, which is about two miles from the studios. The Kings Row transmitter then relays the signal to the transmitter "out the highway" about 10 miles away. The transmitter connects the signal to the towers. The towers then transmit KRSA's radio signal to the other towers located in Wrangell, Sitka and Haines-bringing God filled programming to your radio on am and fm channels!
 

John Sr. and Jr. prepare their climbing gear.

They must have everything tied to thier climbing belts. Even to be careful not to drop anything-because it's a long way down!

They must secure the beacon light with a rope and then use a pully system to get the light to the top of the tower. Each becaon weighs approximately 35 pounds!

 

 

 

 

                                                                               

                                                         Lots to consider.

Lots to pray about before climbing! One in thirty tower climbers die each year!

Warning signs all around remind them of the danger of their service. God Bless these men!

 

John Jr. was the first to climb.

 

Notice the wooden ladder...they cannot touch the tower from standing on the ground because of the hightened risk of electricution! Therefore, they must use a wooden ladder and not a metal ladder to mount the tower.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joh Sr. is the elecrtician. He will do all of the necessary connections and disconnections of the beacon's wiring.

He has the yellow rope attached to use belt which is used for lowering the broken beacon and pulling up the new one and anyother tools or supplies needed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trusty Harvey Gilliland is there every moment maintaining the rope and ground support.

 

 

 

 

 

It takes approximately one hour to climb UP the 280 foot tower and about an hour to climb DOWN.

The climbers need to rest several times. This day it just happened to be drizzliing rain and slight winds. Proper gloves and clothing need to be worn to avoid fatigue. One does not need to worry about being cold or tired when you are 280 ft in the air working with high voltages of electricity!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

THANK YOU JOHN HURNI SENIOR AND JOHN HUNI JUNIOR

FOR PUTTING YOUR LIVES VISIBLEY IN THE HAND'S OF GOD to get the beacons working again!

         
 

 

 

 

THANK YOU

HARVEY GILLILAND

FOR ALL OF YOUR HELP AND TECHNICAL SUPPORT-YOU ALSO ARE A GOD SEND!!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

THANK YOU TOO

SARAH

FOR ALL OF YOUR SUPPORT AND ENCOURAGEMENT. YOU ARE A TROOPER!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


OCTOBER 16th - 22nd

October 16, 1930 - The Presbyterian Church at Wrangell, the oldest one in Alaska, was destroyed by fire.
October 17, 1873 - Thomas Riggs, who became the 9th governor of Alaska, was born in Maryland.
October 18, 1867 - The United States formally took possession of the Territory of Alaska with the raising of the flag at New Archangel, now Sitka.
October 19, 1889 - The first and perhaps only, Alaska post of the Grand Army of the Republic was organized in Juneau.
October 20, 1959 - The city of Juneau proposed construction of a new state Legislattive and Court building, and offered to donate the land.
October 21, 1904 - The Dillingham post office was established, named for U. S. Senator William P. Dillingham who had visited the town.
October 22, 1949 - A gold rush was on! Reports arrived of pea-sized nuggets found on the Yukon River, 160 miles north of Fairbanks. It was known as the Fishwheel Strike.


 


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